Now Playing Tracks

… “We headed behind the Masquerade to the Music Park, grabbed a spot on the grass, and enjoyed a cheesesteak from one of the various food trucks in the back of the field asFred The Godson took the stage. Out of the Bronx, New York, Fred The Godson was the first of many acts on Friday to represent the East Coast, but there was once again worldwide representation at A3C throughout the night. He commanded the outdoor stage with his classic sound and almost immediately distinguishable voice. His hit “Too Fat” worked the crowd up with its old-school take on new hip-hop sounds. It was a great way to ease us back into the music, combining sounds of the greats that came before him but putting his own spin on things.
Speaking of the greats that came before him, that seemed to be the name of the game on Friday. Prodigy of Mobb Deep was up next, performing to an energized and eager crowd. The way that A3C has legends sitting up against the new faces of hip-hop is something special; it once again shows the unified nature of the event, with the old and the new sharing the same stage and rocking the same crowds. Prodigy’s set itself represented that notion—he mixed Mobb Deep classics with his newer solo material to perfect cohesion. The crowd in the Masquerade Music Park was reciting all the words right along with him on songs like standouts from the classic record, The Infamous, “Shook Ones, Pt. II” and “Survival Of The Fittest.” With the depth of Mobb Deep’s catalog, Prodigy could have rifled through the hits all night, but his set was over in a flash, leaving his songs to echo in our heads throughout the duration of the beautiful night.
After some proper East coast representation, the iHipHop Distribution Stage in the Music Park needed some left coast sounds to balance things out. It is All 3 Coasts festival, after all. The next performer, with roots in both Atlanta and Los Angeles, had two of those coasts covered, and represented the diversity of hip-hop in his style. J-Lie, of both South Korean and South African ancestry, not only represents both of his cities in his unique sound, but he also has a bit of his cultural heritage emanating from his music. He took the stage sitting on a chair, performing a subdued, yet somehow explosive verse before bursting up from his seat and delivering a fiery set. He tackled issues of his race and showed that though J-Lie is different from your typical emcee, he is to be taken seriously. With the skills on display on the stage that night, he wouldn’t even have to literally command the crowd’s respect to earn it.
J-Lie’s stifling southern swing on hazy West coast production was the perfect segue to the classic California sound of Nipsey Hussle. The young man working simply off the back of some renowned mixtapes—his album is set to come out next year—showed why he is one of the biggest and brightest stars on the rise in hip-hop today. Nipsey Hussleperformed mostly cuts from his last two mixtapes, The Marathon and The Marathon Continues, as the crowd bounced in unison under the blackening sky. He showed exactly why he was put in such a high profile spot, commanding the crowd with his blend of street-wise lyrics and ferocious delivery. He brought out Torae, who was set to perform himself later on in the evening, and the two exchanged verses, showing the diversity of each of the emcee’s styles and how well it blends together in a live setting.Nipsey Hussle ended his set in a fit of energy, with the entire crowd completely swept up in his amplified set.
- Jeff Pearson
Tactiletracks.com
Zoom Info
… “We headed behind the Masquerade to the Music Park, grabbed a spot on the grass, and enjoyed a cheesesteak from one of the various food trucks in the back of the field asFred The Godson took the stage. Out of the Bronx, New York, Fred The Godson was the first of many acts on Friday to represent the East Coast, but there was once again worldwide representation at A3C throughout the night. He commanded the outdoor stage with his classic sound and almost immediately distinguishable voice. His hit “Too Fat” worked the crowd up with its old-school take on new hip-hop sounds. It was a great way to ease us back into the music, combining sounds of the greats that came before him but putting his own spin on things.
Speaking of the greats that came before him, that seemed to be the name of the game on Friday. Prodigy of Mobb Deep was up next, performing to an energized and eager crowd. The way that A3C has legends sitting up against the new faces of hip-hop is something special; it once again shows the unified nature of the event, with the old and the new sharing the same stage and rocking the same crowds. Prodigy’s set itself represented that notion—he mixed Mobb Deep classics with his newer solo material to perfect cohesion. The crowd in the Masquerade Music Park was reciting all the words right along with him on songs like standouts from the classic record, The Infamous, “Shook Ones, Pt. II” and “Survival Of The Fittest.” With the depth of Mobb Deep’s catalog, Prodigy could have rifled through the hits all night, but his set was over in a flash, leaving his songs to echo in our heads throughout the duration of the beautiful night.
After some proper East coast representation, the iHipHop Distribution Stage in the Music Park needed some left coast sounds to balance things out. It is All 3 Coasts festival, after all. The next performer, with roots in both Atlanta and Los Angeles, had two of those coasts covered, and represented the diversity of hip-hop in his style. J-Lie, of both South Korean and South African ancestry, not only represents both of his cities in his unique sound, but he also has a bit of his cultural heritage emanating from his music. He took the stage sitting on a chair, performing a subdued, yet somehow explosive verse before bursting up from his seat and delivering a fiery set. He tackled issues of his race and showed that though J-Lie is different from your typical emcee, he is to be taken seriously. With the skills on display on the stage that night, he wouldn’t even have to literally command the crowd’s respect to earn it.
J-Lie’s stifling southern swing on hazy West coast production was the perfect segue to the classic California sound of Nipsey Hussle. The young man working simply off the back of some renowned mixtapes—his album is set to come out next year—showed why he is one of the biggest and brightest stars on the rise in hip-hop today. Nipsey Hussleperformed mostly cuts from his last two mixtapes, The Marathon and The Marathon Continues, as the crowd bounced in unison under the blackening sky. He showed exactly why he was put in such a high profile spot, commanding the crowd with his blend of street-wise lyrics and ferocious delivery. He brought out Torae, who was set to perform himself later on in the evening, and the two exchanged verses, showing the diversity of each of the emcee’s styles and how well it blends together in a live setting.Nipsey Hussle ended his set in a fit of energy, with the entire crowd completely swept up in his amplified set.
- Jeff Pearson
Tactiletracks.com
Zoom Info
… “We headed behind the Masquerade to the Music Park, grabbed a spot on the grass, and enjoyed a cheesesteak from one of the various food trucks in the back of the field asFred The Godson took the stage. Out of the Bronx, New York, Fred The Godson was the first of many acts on Friday to represent the East Coast, but there was once again worldwide representation at A3C throughout the night. He commanded the outdoor stage with his classic sound and almost immediately distinguishable voice. His hit “Too Fat” worked the crowd up with its old-school take on new hip-hop sounds. It was a great way to ease us back into the music, combining sounds of the greats that came before him but putting his own spin on things.
Speaking of the greats that came before him, that seemed to be the name of the game on Friday. Prodigy of Mobb Deep was up next, performing to an energized and eager crowd. The way that A3C has legends sitting up against the new faces of hip-hop is something special; it once again shows the unified nature of the event, with the old and the new sharing the same stage and rocking the same crowds. Prodigy’s set itself represented that notion—he mixed Mobb Deep classics with his newer solo material to perfect cohesion. The crowd in the Masquerade Music Park was reciting all the words right along with him on songs like standouts from the classic record, The Infamous, “Shook Ones, Pt. II” and “Survival Of The Fittest.” With the depth of Mobb Deep’s catalog, Prodigy could have rifled through the hits all night, but his set was over in a flash, leaving his songs to echo in our heads throughout the duration of the beautiful night.
After some proper East coast representation, the iHipHop Distribution Stage in the Music Park needed some left coast sounds to balance things out. It is All 3 Coasts festival, after all. The next performer, with roots in both Atlanta and Los Angeles, had two of those coasts covered, and represented the diversity of hip-hop in his style. J-Lie, of both South Korean and South African ancestry, not only represents both of his cities in his unique sound, but he also has a bit of his cultural heritage emanating from his music. He took the stage sitting on a chair, performing a subdued, yet somehow explosive verse before bursting up from his seat and delivering a fiery set. He tackled issues of his race and showed that though J-Lie is different from your typical emcee, he is to be taken seriously. With the skills on display on the stage that night, he wouldn’t even have to literally command the crowd’s respect to earn it.
J-Lie’s stifling southern swing on hazy West coast production was the perfect segue to the classic California sound of Nipsey Hussle. The young man working simply off the back of some renowned mixtapes—his album is set to come out next year—showed why he is one of the biggest and brightest stars on the rise in hip-hop today. Nipsey Hussleperformed mostly cuts from his last two mixtapes, The Marathon and The Marathon Continues, as the crowd bounced in unison under the blackening sky. He showed exactly why he was put in such a high profile spot, commanding the crowd with his blend of street-wise lyrics and ferocious delivery. He brought out Torae, who was set to perform himself later on in the evening, and the two exchanged verses, showing the diversity of each of the emcee’s styles and how well it blends together in a live setting.Nipsey Hussle ended his set in a fit of energy, with the entire crowd completely swept up in his amplified set.
- Jeff Pearson
Tactiletracks.com
Zoom Info

… “We headed behind the Masquerade to the Music Park, grabbed a spot on the grass, and enjoyed a cheesesteak from one of the various food trucks in the back of the field asFred The Godson took the stage. Out of the Bronx, New York, Fred The Godson was the first of many acts on Friday to represent the East Coast, but there was once again worldwide representation at A3C throughout the night. He commanded the outdoor stage with his classic sound and almost immediately distinguishable voice. His hit “Too Fat” worked the crowd up with its old-school take on new hip-hop sounds. It was a great way to ease us back into the music, combining sounds of the greats that came before him but putting his own spin on things.

Speaking of the greats that came before him, that seemed to be the name of the game on Friday. Prodigy of Mobb Deep was up next, performing to an energized and eager crowd. The way that A3C has legends sitting up against the new faces of hip-hop is something special; it once again shows the unified nature of the event, with the old and the new sharing the same stage and rocking the same crowds. Prodigy’s set itself represented that notion—he mixed Mobb Deep classics with his newer solo material to perfect cohesion. The crowd in the Masquerade Music Park was reciting all the words right along with him on songs like standouts from the classic record, The Infamous, “Shook Ones, Pt. II” and “Survival Of The Fittest.” With the depth of Mobb Deep’s catalog, Prodigy could have rifled through the hits all night, but his set was over in a flash, leaving his songs to echo in our heads throughout the duration of the beautiful night.

After some proper East coast representation, the iHipHop Distribution Stage in the Music Park needed some left coast sounds to balance things out. It is All 3 Coasts festival, after all. The next performer, with roots in both Atlanta and Los Angeles, had two of those coasts covered, and represented the diversity of hip-hop in his style. J-Lie, of both South Korean and South African ancestry, not only represents both of his cities in his unique sound, but he also has a bit of his cultural heritage emanating from his music. He took the stage sitting on a chair, performing a subdued, yet somehow explosive verse before bursting up from his seat and delivering a fiery set. He tackled issues of his race and showed that though J-Lie is different from your typical emcee, he is to be taken seriously. With the skills on display on the stage that night, he wouldn’t even have to literally command the crowd’s respect to earn it.

J-Lie’s stifling southern swing on hazy West coast production was the perfect segue to the classic California sound of Nipsey Hussle. The young man working simply off the back of some renowned mixtapes—his album is set to come out next year—showed why he is one of the biggest and brightest stars on the rise in hip-hop today. Nipsey Hussleperformed mostly cuts from his last two mixtapes, The Marathon and The Marathon Continues, as the crowd bounced in unison under the blackening sky. He showed exactly why he was put in such a high profile spot, commanding the crowd with his blend of street-wise lyrics and ferocious delivery. He brought out Torae, who was set to perform himself later on in the evening, and the two exchanged verses, showing the diversity of each of the emcee’s styles and how well it blends together in a live setting.Nipsey Hussle ended his set in a fit of energy, with the entire crowd completely swept up in his amplified set.

- Jeff Pearson

Tactiletracks.com

To Tumblr, Love Pixel Union